in Aerospace

UK Government cracks down on misuse of laser pointers

Posted 15 August 2017 · Add Comment

The UK Government has launched a call for evidence into the regulation of laser pointers, including the potential value of retail licensing schemes, advertising restrictions, and potential restrictions on ownership in order to address serious public safety concerns.

The move comes in response to an increase in laser incidents in recent years.

A survey of UK ophthalmologists reported over 150 incidents of eye injuries involving laser pointers since 2013, the vast majority of these involving children.

In addition, the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) has reported an increase in incidents of laser pointers being directed into the cockpits of helicopters and planes on take-off and landing.

Last year an Air Ambulance helicopter pilot was rendered temporarily blind by a laser attack that could have had catastrophic consequences.

The government is seeking responses from business groups, aviation and transport bodies, retailers, health bodies and the general public, to identify and tackle the problem, while enabling legitimate businesses to continue to trade.

The government will consider the potential advantages and disadvantages of licensing schemes, advertising bans, and an awareness raising campaign to educate people about the dangers of laser pointers. The government is already working with online retail sites such as Amazon to ensure that where unsafe laser pointers are identified they are removed from sale.

Under current regulations, only laser pointers that are considered safe for their intended use should be sold to consumers. However, there is evidence that these regulations are not always adhered to, and there have been reported cases of high-powered lasers being sold – sometimes unwittingly – for general use. Licensing schemes exist in countries such as New Zealand, Australia, Canada, Sweden and the United States of America. The government will look at the case for a similar scheme that could be rolled out in the UK where the retailer or consumer must apply for and obtain a licence for a high-powered laser pointer.

Business Minister, Margot James, said: "Public safety is of the utmost importance and we must look carefully to make sure regulations are keeping up with the increased use of these devices. Whilst we know most users don’t intend any harm, many are not aware of the safety risks and serious health implications of shining laser pointers directly into people’s eyes. Used irresponsibly or maliciously, these products can and do wreak havoc and harm others, with potentially catastrophic consequences.

"That’s why we want to hear from business groups, retailers and consumers about the best way to protect the public from this kind of dangerous behaviour and improve safety."

Professor John O’Hagan of Public Health England, said: "This consultation will allow us to explore what more can be done to minimise the risks associated with lasers available to the public. Mislabelling of products, counterfeit products, imports of powerful devices from the Far East and cheap novelty products bought innocently on holiday can put consumers and particularly children, at risk of eye injuries.

Brian Strutton, General Secretary of the British Airline Pilots Association (BALPA), said: "When a laser is shone into a pilot’s eye, they experience a bright flash and a dazzling effect. This can distract them and leads to temporary loss of vision in the affected eye.
"Startling, dazzling and distracting a pilot at a critical stage of flight has the potential to cause a crash and loss of life. This is especially a problem for helicopters, which operate close to the ground and are sometimes single pilot operations.

"There is also a growing concern that, as the power of available lasers increases, the possibility of permanent damage being caused to pilots’ and passengers’ eyes increases.

"We would like to see the laser threat taken very seriously before there is a fatal accident and BALPA therefore supports the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy in their call for evidence."

The call for evidence launched on Saturday and will be open for responses for eight weeks, closing on Friday 6 October.

* required field

Post a comment

Other Stories
Advertisement
Latest News

QinetiQ brings autonomy expertise to European research programme

QinetiQ is to play a pivotal role in OCEAN2020, the first research programme awarded by the European Defence Agency as part of its European Defence Fund initiative.

Lincad wins Leonardo power management contract

Lincad, the British manufacturer of bespoke batteries, chargers and power management systems for military applications, is pleased to announce that it has won a further contract with Leonardo to supply batteries and other power

MAEL and Icelandair expand maintenance partnership

Monarch Aircraft Engineering (MAEL) has won an expanded maintenance commitment from Icelandair.

Oxford Airport hosts hullo launch

Following the successful introduction of the hullo Aircrew brand at EBACE last year, the technology start-up has officially launched its industry-first software platform at London Oxford Airport, which is designed to connect

Babcock to develop Busan base

Further strengthening its international reach and its presence in South Korea, Babcock International has announced that it is to open a facility in Busan, South Korea’s second largest city after its capital Seoul.

Innalabs secures €2.6m ESA contract.

InnaLabs has announced a €2.6m contract with ESA to design, develop, manufacture and test a highly reliable radiation hardened 3-axis gyroscope, used for measuring angular velocity or maintaining orientation of satellites.

Aviation Africa SK18418
See us at
SMI FAVSABT2411120418S&P BT281117080318Aviation Africa BT18418SMI HelicopterTBT1402240518FIL18 BT111017220718SMI FAVWSBT1402060618