in Aerospace

Cranfield delivers ECS diagnostic software to Boeing

Posted 11 July 2017 · Add Comment

Cranfield University's Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) Centre has marked nearly a decade of working with Boeing AHM (Aircraft Health Monitoring) by developing and delivering a key piece of software to the company, enabling it to diagnose impending faults in aircraft environmental control systems (ECS).



SESAC (Simscape ECS Simulation for All Conditions), software developed by the IVHM Centre, simulates faults in aircraft ECS. This simulation enables aircraft engineers and mechanics to better diagnose faults when they happen and to take timely and preventative action.  This directly influences aircraft maintenance and operating costs.

SESAC will be used by Boeing in its AHM software which services many airlines around the world.

The delivery of this software is being seen by the two organisations as a major milestone in an ongoing long-term programme of work.
 
Generic technology resulting from the programme is being extended by the company to include other important sub-systems on the aircraft, which is applicable to virtually all aircraft types.

Cranfield University and Boeing have worked together in the Integrated Vehicle Health Management field for nearly ten years, with the aim of furthering the research and development in this advanced field of technology and translating the results into world-leading commercial offerings.

John Maggiore, Managing Director, Maintenance and Leasing Solutions, Boeing Digital Aviation, said, “Boeing is proud of the fruitful partnership with Cranfield University and the ongoing work programme with the Cranfield IVHM Centre.  It is yet another way in which we can embed industry-leading and innovative capabilities into our customer solutions such as Boeing Airplane Health Management, a key part of the Boeing AnalytX suite.”

Professor Ian Jennions, Centre Director, said “With the addition of the Boeing 737 test bed we now have the ability to deliver research to companies like Boeing from the fundamentals in the lab, to real world on the plane, across the full range of technology readiness levels. This range of research makes the IVHM Centre an exciting place to be for both staff, students, and industry.”

 

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