in Space

BAE Systems launches next-gen computer for space

Posted 23 August 2017 · Add Comment

BAE Systems today announced a new generation of its flagship space computer that combines fast performance and extreme resiliency to enable previously impossible missions in the harsh environment of space.



Above: A BAE Systems employee solders components onto a RAD5545 single-board computer.

The new RAD5545TM single-board computer (SBC) provides next-generation spacecraft with the high-performance onboard processing capacity needed to support future space missions — from weather and planetary exploration to communications, surveillance, tracking, and national security missions. The RAD5545 SBC delivers exponential improvements in size, speed, and power-efficiency over its proven predecessor, the RAD750® SBC.

“We’ve been delivering radiation-hardened components for almost three decades, and our customers have come to trust the performance, reliability, and longevity of our technology,” said Dave Rea, director of On-board Processing and Advanced Technology at BAE Systems. “The RAD5545 SBC is the next step in the evolution of space computers. It’s the most technologically advanced radiation-hardened, general-purpose processor for space applications.”

A single RAD5545 SBC replaces multiple cards on previous generations of spacecraft. It combines high performance, large amounts of memory, and fast throughput to improve spacecraft capability, efficiency, and mission performance. With its improved computational throughput, storage, and bandwidth, it will provide spacecraft with the ability to conduct new missions, including those requiring encryption processing, multiple operating systems, ultra high-resolution image processing, autonomous operation and simultaneous support for multiple payloads — missions that were impossible with previous single-board computers.

The RAD5545 SBC is produced at the company’s facility in Manassas, Virginia. The facility is a US Department of Defense Category 1A Microelectronics Trusted Source. The company has provided more than 900 computers on over 300 satellites and has provided the computers that power key national space assets, including some that are hundreds of millions of miles away from Earth.


                                                            

* required field

Post a comment

Other Stories
Advertisement
Latest News

Space telescope tackles skills shortage

The skills gap in the UK has been delivered a fresh blow after a team of engineering students from Sheffield University - with a little help from Harmonic Drive UK - successfully launched a new solar telescope mounted on a high-altitude

SSTL ships CARBONITE-2 and Telesat's LEO-1 for PSLV launch

Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd (SSTL) has shipped two small satellites, CARBONITE-2 and LEO-1, to India in preparation for a late December launch on ISRO's Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV) from the Sriharikota launch site.

Commsoft brings Titan Airways to OASES

Commsoft has welcomed the UK-based leasing and charter airline, Titan Airways, to the fast-growing global OASES community.

British Standard for information security risk revised

BSI, the business standards company, has revised its guidance standard for information security management systems, BS 7799-3 Guidelines for information security risk management.

Cobham Antenna approved for Inmarsat Global Xpress

Cobham SATCOM has received Inmarsat Type Approval for operation of its EXPLORER 8100GX one metre antenna system on the Global Xpress satellite network.

CAA opens consultation on airline assistance for people with hidden disabilities

The UK Civil Aviation Authority is consulting on a new regulatory framework, designed to ensure passengers with hidden disabilities get the assistance they need from airlines.

Aviation Africa SK18418
See us at
Aviation Africa BT18418SMI NCWBT3110020218SMI FAVSABT2411120418FIL18 BT111017220718